10 Facts About Prison System

Many Americans go about their daily lives with very little clue about just how extensive, brutal and unprecedented the american prison system is. Despite the fact that the jail population and prison abuse has been growing exponentially over the past decade. John Legend’s recent quotation of a statistic regarding Black men and the prison system was probably the first time. Several American were made aware of the actual fact that there are presently more Black men under the control of the American criminal justice system than what were enslaved in 1850.

Prison System

Prison System

If that did not serve has a wake up call to acknowledge the truth of the brutality, size and injustice of american justice, here are 10 facts about prison systems

10 Facts About Prison System :-

  1. Does prison work?

    Prison System

    Prison System

    In a similar time frame to the rocketing upwards of the prison population, crime has been falling. Between 1988 and 2008, the crime rate within the States fell by about 25th. Could this mean that putting all those people behind bars is actually cutting crime? That’s one thing that will always be hard to prove and experts say much of the rise in incarceration is down to strict mandatory sentences brought in as a part of the War on drugs.

  2. Value for money?

    Prison System

    Prison System

    Keeping people in jail is expensive. the average cost varies depending on which state is doing the locking up. New York prisoners cost about $60,000-a-year. Indiana is one among the cheapest at close to $14,000-a-year. A minimum security federal prison inmate costs. On average, $21,000, when it involves high-security that rises to about $33,000. Parole is much cheaper, costing under $8-a-day, whereas prison prices around $80-a-day. Taxpayers are reckoned to pay $39 billion-a-year to fund America’s prisons with the full budget for incarceration being $60.3 billion. By 2020, the Department of Justice reckons it’ll be spending 30 % of its budgets on federal prisons.

  3. The most incarcerated within the world

    Prison System

    Prison System

    The american prison population is proportionally the highest in the world. In 2009, of every 100,000 Americans 743 were lock up. Since in 2008 one in 31 adults were either imprisoned or under some form of legal supervision like probation or parole. In 2009 that figure was 7.2 million people. Also in 2013, the prison population alone said to be over 2.4 million, over 1 % of USA citizens.

  4. Rocketing upwards

    Prison System

    Prison System

    From 1980 to 2009 the prison population in America quadrupled. According to the pew Centre it tripled between 1987 and 2007.

  5. Race plays its part

    Prison System

    Prison System

    America has certainly had a history of troubled race relations and many campaigners suggest the racial make-up of the prison population is a reflection of continued racism. In 2008 one in 11 African Americans were either in prison or below supervision. Latinos were conjointly in the jail system at a high rate of around 3.7 percent.

  6. The drugs don’t work…

    Prison System

    Prison System

    Much of the large growth within the U.S.A. prison population has been driven by one of the longest-running wars in history, the war on drugs. Since the first 1970s that’s meant tough minimum sentences for all kinds of drug offences. On December 31, 2011 of the 197,050 prisoners in federal hands, 94,600 were drug offenders, dwarfing any other group of inmate. The picture is slightly different at a state level, where on the same date there were quarter-of-a-million drug offenders out of 1,341,804 offenders in total. Around 1 / 4 of adults on probation are drug offenders and a third of those on parole. The Justice Policy Institute says that 1 / 4 of the US’s jail population are drug offenders and 6.8 million Americans are drug abusers or drug dependent.

  7. Fostering resentment?

    Prison System

    Prison System

    While the racial make-up of America’s prison population is controversial, all ethnic groups are dwarfed in size inside by another group of Americans, people who are through the foster care system. In California as many as 70% of prisoners had had some experience of fostering.

  8. A labor market

    Prison System

    Prison System

    There are lots of people ready to argue that America’s ever growing prison population is benefiting someone, and it’s not the victims of crime. They see the prison business as an enormous racket producing large profits and a large pool of incredibly low-cost labor. 37 of the states allow private companies to use prisoner labor and some of the biggest and known businesses in the world ‘employ’ prisoners – IBM, Microsoft, Dell, Hewlett Packard and Intel are simply a few. From 1980 to 1994 profits from prisons went up to $1.31 billion from $392 million. Some prisoners are paid the minimum wage, however many are not. Some privately-run prisons pay 17 cents an hour. This low cost labor is seen as another to outsourcing american jobs to low-wage economies.

  9. Over 3,000 prisoners are serving life without parole for nonviolent crimes in US.

    Prison System

    Prison System

    The american Civil Liberties Union’s 2013 report “A Living Death” documented 3,281 prisoners who are slap with life sentences without parole for nonviolent crimes, together with shoplifting a jacket, stealing gas from a truck and selling $10 worth of marijuana. About 65% were black and plenty of were struggling with mental health issues.

  10. A matter of life and death

    Prison System

    Prison System

    America’s use of the death penalty means it has to keep many prisoners on death row awaiting execution. This costs a fortune, New Jersey spent $253 million-a-year at $11 million for each inmate. At the beginning of 2013 3,125 inmates were on death row. Many prisoners spend many years on death row, most prisoners pay at least a decade on ward and some more than 20, the longest time between a conviction and execution was 36 years.

Based on a large-scale analysis of government statistics, original analysis and a review of existent literature, the report found that a lot of more people pass through local jails than through federal prisons.
It additionally found that a large percentage of jail inmates come back from marginalized populations, that they often stay in jail. Just because of lack of money, which even a short stint behind bars can have profound negative effects on a person’s life.

Comments

Leave a Reply