12 Amazing Statue of Liberty Facts

, the outstanding work of French sculptor, Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi is a personification of liberty.

She is far more than just a sculpture. A friend, a living symbol of freedom to millions of people around the world, the statue of liberty is an iconic monument that stands at the entrance to harbour of New York welcoming immigrants to the united states. This exemplary statue of a robed female figure, bearing a torch and a tablet within the other hand, reading the american date of Independence, may be a designated UNESCO World Heritage site. Okay you already grasp all that, right? Haven’t we been reading regarding her since the third grade? While you think you’re terribly familiar with the colossus, there are several facts about the statue which will leave you awestruck. Don’t believe me? Have a look for yourself! Here are 12 Fascinating facts about the statue of Liberty.

Statue of Liberty Facts

Statue of Liberty Facts

12 Amazing Statue of Liberty Facts :

  1. “The statue of Liberty” is actually just a nickname.

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    When Bartholdi first gifted the statue to America, he known as it “Liberty Enlightening the world,” Which may be a more direct reference to the statue’s unifying symbolism. Other nicknames for the statue of Liberty include: Everybody’s lady, lady with a Torch, Mother of Exiles and grande dame, just to name a few.

  2. It took lady Liberty over 20 years to turn green.

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Many people know the story of the green woman’s original copper hue. The statue is created from hammered copper the thickness of 2 pennies, and looked like a shiny new coin when it was first erected. However, did you are aware of it took over 20 years for the statue to achieve its final color? It must have been rough during lady Liberty’s teen years, when she was a splotchy mixture of green and copper.

  3. Thomas Alva Edison wanted to make her talk.

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    After he debuted his phonograph, Thomas Edison revealed that he was planning to create a “monster disc” that will go in the statue’s base and project speeches to all of Manhattan. The concept was eventually scrapped as a result of we assume, it had been laughably creepy.

  4. Was not a gift from France:

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Contrary to popular belief, statue of Liberty wasn’t very a gift from France to America. It was Bartholdi who wished to make a colossus that was to be remembered and celebrated for ages. He at first planned it for Egypt’s Suez Canal but after the proposal getting rejected, America became his priority. The govt. did not significantly fund it and Frederic Auguste Bartholdi was expected to raise money for the monument on an individual level. It had been Pulitzer, a newspaper publisher who helped him raise money for the statue.

  5.  She almost went to Egypt.

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi, the person behind the statue, never initially planned for the statue of Liberty to go to America. One of the places he pitched the idea to was actually Egypt, during the development of the Suez Canal. The statue would are adorned in a traditional Egyptian slave dress to indicate freedom and humility. However, when Bartholdi pitched the concept to Egypt, the country’s leader rejected it.

  6. That isn’t actually a crown she’s carrying on her head.

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Lady Liberty’s headgear is actually a halo and the spikes surrounding it are meant to be the light emanating from it. There are seven beams of light, every of which meant to represent one of the seven continents and together they symbolize peace and unity.

  7. The Torch changed 3 times:

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    In 1984, the first torch was replaced by a new cooper torch coated with a think gold layer. It was then modified to introduce portholes for light to illuminated from inside and be visible. Thi idea failed and Gutzon Borglum, the sculptor of Mount Rushmore, added glass panels but that failed too. So, the first gold clad flame restored in 1986.

  8.  Originally designed for Egypt:

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi, the sculptor of statue of Liberty, intended for the statue to be built for the entrance of Suez Canal. Frederic Auguste Bartholdi had visited Egypt and wanted to create a work as mesmerising as the Pyramids and Sphinx. The leader of Egypt didn’t appear very pleased by the offer and thus it fell upon the hands of Americans.

  9. Lady Liberty has a close relative in Paris.

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    The inner framework supporting the statue of Liberty created by the good French engineer Gustave Eiffel. Do you recognize his name? He went on to design the Eiffel Tower seven years after working on lady Liberty. He even used the same plans to form both iconic statues.

  10. Shoe size:

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    This beauty contains a waistline of 35 feet and a huge shoe size of 879! And you’re scared of big foot? Ha!

  11. Boston wanted to take the statue:

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    When the fundraising was almost failing in New York, Boston showed excitement and support for the statue to erected in their town. When people of New York came to understand about this, they grew more involved about it as it was being snatched away from their hands. The statue remained in New York as they sped up the fundraiser.

  12. Proposed to be coated in gold:

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Statue of Liberty Facts

    Bartholdi needed the statue to coated by a thin layer of gold and not copper. Why? Well, Bartholdi thought the statue won’t be visible in the dark if coated with copper, whereas, gold would make it more noticeable. The idea rejected as the statue alone costed plenty of money, there wasn’t enough time or fund to get this idea worked upon.

Rome wasn’t built in a day, afterall. The beautiful statue we see today, has gone through a number of changes and hardships. A symbol of liberty, the statue could be a masterpiece of colossal statuary. On June 17, 1885, 200,000 people lined the docks of lower Manhattan to watch the French steamer Isére carry the statue of Liberty into new york harbor. 100 and thirty years later, join us in celebrating the coming of a national icon with this colossal roundup of trivia. Just in case you missed it, our dear old statue of Liberty turned 130 this week. Despite being such an iconic image of american ideals, there is a lot now we know about the giant green woman.

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